Tag: ipad

March 9, 2019

Telstra this week has launched eSIM support, making them the first carrier to support eSIM devices other than wearables (eg, the Apple Watch and Samsung Galaxy Watch, which only support ‘number sharing’ plans and not separate accounts).

While this is ‘officially’ only supported on Windows 10 devices with a built in eSIM (such as the 2017 Microsoft Surface Pro, or a handful of HP Spectre models), as the eSIM is just another standard (like ye olde plastic SIM), most other devices that support eSIMs can make use of this.

Current devices that support eSIMs range from Windows 10 devices (as above), through to Apple’s iPhone XS, XS Max and XR, the Apple iPad Pro (2017) and Google’s Pixel 3/XL.

Telstra currently offers two eSIM specific plans; the ‘Telstra Mobile Data Connect’ plan on prepaid (which will give you 30GB for free to kick things off, which expires 30 days from activation), and the ‘Mobile Data Plan 10GB’ on postpaid (offering 10GB for $10/month).

On Windows 10, you make use of the ‘Mobile Plans‘ app to officially sign up for these eSIM plans, where Telstra appears as an option alongside Ubigi and GigSky. Things are pretty easy, as you’d expect (being ‘officially supported’) – it’s pretty much as easy as hitting ‘Get connected‘ and following the steps. But it turns out, the Mobile Plans app is merely just a browser window, and if you find a link in the Mobile Plans app, you can drag it into another browser like Chrome or Edge. And that’s how you can work out how to make eSIMs happen on other devices. 😉

Here is how you can activate and ‘provision’ an eSIM device on the Telstra Mobile Data Connect prepaid plan, and then add it on an Apple iPad or iPhone.

January 30, 2013
December 14, 2012

If you’re like me and you like to have a look around and find out how things work, you’ve probably wondered what’s installed on your iPhone. While this is easy enough to do if you’re jailbroken, that doesn’t help if you’ve got a fairly recent device, such as the iPad 2, or iPhone 4S. However, some App Store apps have some secret ‘backdoor’ access – not actively touting it infront of Apple, but not disallowing it either.
The other downside to this is that you can only look; you can’t touch anything. This means you can’t edit any files sadly, nor can you upload your own files outside of the apps’ own sandbox.

October 3, 2012

One of my favourite things about the iPhone is that it’s fairly painless to throw another SIM card into your iPhone, and have all of your carriers settings just work (internet, MMS, voicemail, and tethering if your carrier allows it). The way this magic works is that Apple actually has the settings for all of the official iPhone carriers preloaded into iOS. If you throw in a SIM from a supported carrier, the settings are simply loaded and away you go. These are referred to as carrier bundles (or, carrier settings according to Apple).

Carrier settings updates are small files (about 10 kb) that are installed on your iPhone or iPad (Wi-Fi + Cellular models). Carrier settings include updates to Access Point Names (APNs), MMS settings, features such as tethering, and default apps such as Stocks, Maps, and Weather.

 

On your iOS device, they live at

/var/mobile/Library/Carrier Bundles/ – bundles that have been updated with iTunes, or pushed over the air

/System/Library/Carrier Bundles/ – stock bundles that ship with iOS

On your computer side, they can be found at

~/Library/iTunes/iPhone Carrier Support/

If you haven’t ever had iTunes prompt you about a carrier update, this folder probably won’t exist.

Carrier bundles themselves are simply .zip archives, but with a .ipcc extension instead. They’re named after your carrier, and may also say whether they’re for your iPhone or iPad (Telstra_au_iPhone.ipcc)

September 28, 2012

One of the most frustrating aspects of shopping in a brick and mortar store, is perhaps the waiting. Queuing for the checkout registers is one of the most annoying parts. Especially when the person at the head of the queue is asking a handful of questions, and you only have one thing you want to buy and take away.

Several months ago, Apple introduced the idea of ‘EasyPay’, where you get to be your own self checkout; take out your iPhone and you can scan and pay for accessories yourself. Great if you know exactly what you’re after, have no questions, and you just want to get there and then go.

First up, you’re going to need to install the Apple Store app; this works on the iPhone, iPod touch and the iPad if you’ve got a camera.
You also need to have location services enabled if you’ve turned them off, and you need to connect to the ‘Apple Store’ WiFi network.
This is how Apple can verify you are actually at the Apple Store!

Upon opening the app, you should see  the store you’re in displayed;